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Allie Wing

Welcome Deacon Alfonso Gamez

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Please welcome Deacon Alfonso Gamez, who will be working with us at St. Brigid of Kildare as a transitional deacon throughout this year.
Deacon Alfonso Gamez, was recently ordained to the Transitional Diaconate for the Diocese of Charlotte, North Carolina.  Before entering seminary, he completed a bachelors degree in political science from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 2013.  Since then, he has been enrolled in the priestly formation program at the Pontifical College Josephinum. Deacon Alfonso enjoys watching movies with his brother seminarians and discussing their theological themes.  As he enters into his final year of seminary formation and final preparations for Priestly Ordination, he looks forward to learning and growing from the St. Brigid community. By God’s grace, Deacon Alfonso hopes to be ordained to the priesthood on June 22nd, 2019 in Huntersville, North Carolina.  Please keep him in your prayers and be assured of his prayers for you and your family as well.  Watch for upcoming email gospel reflections written by Deacon Alfonso.

Gospel Reflection Sept 16 – Deacon Paul

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Sunday, September 16

Twenty-fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mark 8: 27 – 35

Gospel:
Jesus and his disciples set out
for the villages of Caesarea Philippi.
Along the way he asked his disciples,
“Who do people say that I am?”
They said in reply,
“John the Baptist, others Elijah,
still others one of the prophets.”
And he asked them,
“But who do you say that I am?”
Peter said to him in reply,
“You are the Christ.”
Then he warned them not to tell anyone about him.

He began to teach them
that the Son of Man must suffer greatly
and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes,
and be killed, and rise after three days.
He spoke this openly.
Then Peter took him aside and began to rebuke him.
At this he turned around and, looking at his disciples,
rebuked Peter and said, “Get behind me, Satan.
You are thinking not as God does, but as human beings do.”

He summoned the crowd with his disciples and said to them,
“Whoever wishes to come after me must deny himself,
take up his cross, and follow me.
For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it,
but whoever loses his life for my sake
and that of the gospel will save it.”

Reflection:
“You are the Christ.” In today’s Gospel, Peter makes this powerful declaration of faith when Jesus asks his disciples, “Who do you say that I am.” While Peter gets the answer right, he still didn’t totally understand Jesus. Jesus began to explain the true meaning of being God’s anointed one: that He would suffer greatly, be put to death on a cross, but would rise again. Peter could not comprehend a suffering Messiah and he rebuked Jesus for teaching them this. However, Jesus came right back at him and said, “Get behind me, Satan! You are thinking not as God does, but as human beings do.”

Peter was allowing Satan to cloud his understanding and impede God’s will. So, not only would the Son of Man suffer and die, but those who wanted to follow Jesus, truly follow Him, they too must suffer and die. This is not exactly an easy plan or the best recruitment slogan to be a disciple of Jesus. Any of us who wish to follow Jesus must take up the cross and share in Jesus’ struggles and sufferings.

Jesus made it clear from the very beginning that it wasn’t going to be easy to be a disciple. To be a true follower of Christ means we need to change our entire lifestyle. It means that we need to change the way we act, think, and speak. In order to be a follower of Jesus we need to change our entire life, dying to who we used to be, and becoming a new person. So, is your heart ready for this kind of commitment? Are you ready to give it your all? Jesus tells us the reward will be great… for “whoever loses his life for my sake and that of the gospel will save it.”

Deacon Paul Zemanek

EPIC Youth Ministry October 14 Outdoor Clean-up Day

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EPIC Youth Ministry is open to all 6-8th grade students in area public, private, & parochial schools. EPIC meets this month for Mass, fellowship and service!

EPIC Members will attend 12:15 PM Mass as a group (wear your t-shirt & sit by the baptismal font). After 12:15 PM mass, meet in Hendricks Hall for prayer and pizza, followed by our parish outdoor clean up service project! *EPIC T-shirts will be handed out during religious education classes and at SBK school. If you still need to pick up your t-shirt on Oct. 14, come to Hendricks Hall by 12 PM to pick it up and change before mass.

Wear pants, bring gloves, and come ready for hard work and good fun!

Pick-up is 4 PM. PGC compliant adult volunteers are needed during the event.

For more information, contact Laura Ginikos at lginikos@stbrigidofkildare.org or Andrea Komenda at akomenda@stbrigidofkildare.org

Gospel Reflection Sept 9 – Deacon Don

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Sunday, September 9

Twenty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mark 7:31-37

Gospel:
Again Jesus left the district of Tyre
and went by way of Sidon to the Sea of Galilee,
into the district of the Decapolis.
And people brought to him a deaf man who had a speech impediment
and begged him to lay his hand on him.
He took him off by himself away from the crowd.
He put his finger into the man’s ears
and, spitting, touched his tongue;
then he looked up to heaven and groaned, and said to him,
“Ephphatha!”- that is, “Be opened!” –
And immediately the man’s ears were opened,
his speech impediment was removed,
and he spoke plainly.
He ordered them not to tell anyone.
But the more he ordered them not to,
the more they proclaimed it.
They were exceedingly astonished and they said,
“He has done all things well.
He makes the deaf hear and the mute speak.”

Reflection:
In today’s Gospel, we see an example what modern Scripture Scholars have labeled, “The Messianic Secret!” This happens often where Jesus performs a miracle and then, “He ordered them not to tell anyone.” Jesus has not fully revealed Himself to be the Messiah, so others see him still as simply a man with unusual skills. His miracles would get in the way of His true mission on earth – to provide salvation to us all. Today, we can see Jesus as more than simply a “light show” or entertainment. But this miracle as with all of Jesus’ healings, there is more going on here than a physical healing.

In our Catholic Baptisms rituals, there is an “Ephphatha” rite, where the priest or deacon touches the baby’s ears and mouth that one day they may hear the word of God and on another day, they may speak it. All the Baptized are so instructed and burdened. We all need to have our ears opened so that we can hear and understand in its fullness the message of Jesus. In addition to that, once we have heard and understood, the natural consequence is that we go out and speak openly to the world about what we have heard and understood. Both hearing and speaking are inseparable for the Christian disciple.

As in today’s Gospel, when we have truly experienced the power of that message and the love of God in our own lives, we cannot but do what that man did – broadcast it far and wide. With all the added drama and evolving consequences of the Church’s sex abuse crisis affecting each of us, this is the time to listen more than ever to the Word of God and to preach it to others. While it may be more prudent to hunker down and lay in the weeds waiting for this crisis to blow over, it is our time to proclaim that Jesus’ Church is more than a “light show,” more than a crisis in the hierarchy, more than a silencing of our moral voice in a world without Objective Truth. It is a time to reflect that our ears and eyes are open and the Truth and hope of the Gospels remain and are needed – now more than ever.

Deacon Don Poirier

Someone I Love is Aging…and so am I!

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Join Syntero in partnership with the Dublin Community Recreation Center as they help family members and older adults understand the resources available to them and how to access them. There will also be a special presentation on the launch of the Dublin, Aging in Place initiative. You won’t want to miss it!

When: Wednesday, October 17th, 2018
6:30 PM Registration & Refreshments
7:00 – 8:30 PM Expert panel, Q&A

Where: Dublin Community Recreations Center

The program is free of charge but we do ask that you register. Please call 614.410.4579 by October 15th.
For additional details please call Stephanie Jursek, Dublin Older Adults Program Specialist, at 614.301.5645.

Please feel free to share this information and forward this announcement to others. We appreciate your help in getting the word out!

Click here to view the flyer.

NEW Parish Group – CREW

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CREW

Catholics Ready, Eager & Willing

CREW (which stands for Catholics Ready, Eager and Willing) is a new parish group! Throughout the year, there are many times that we could use your hands to help make a difference here at St. Brigid of Kildare.

This is not a committee with members and monthly meetings. This is not a year-round commitment.  CREW is just a list of parishioners who are ready, eager and willing to help around our campus and during special events.

Sign-up today to receive all the CREW requests via email, but only commit to those that appeal to you and fit in your schedule! You’ll meet new people, feel connected to our parish family and be the first to know that we aren’t too shy to ask for help!

Do you enjoy hosting guests? We could use you!
Would you be a pro at directing traffic? We need you!
Do you like to put furniture together? We’d love your help!
Do you have 30 minutes to spare? Maybe an hour? Maybe three? A sporadic schedule? No problem!

Sign up today at stbrigidofkildare.org/CREW

Gospel Reflection Sep 2 – Deacon Frank

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Sunday, September 2
 
Twenty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time
Gospel:
When the Pharisees with some scribes who had come from Jerusalem
gathered around Jesus,
they observed that some of his disciples ate their meals
with unclean, that is, unwashed, hands.
-For the Pharisees and, in fact, all Jews,
do not eat without carefully washing their hands,
keeping the tradition of the elders.
And on coming from the marketplace
they do not eat without purifying themselves.
And there are many other things that they have traditionally observed,
the purification of cups and jugs and kettles and beds. –
So the Pharisees and scribes questioned him,
“Why do your disciples not follow the tradition of the elders
but instead eat a meal with unclean hands?”
He responded,
“Well did Isaiah prophesy about you hypocrites, as it is written:
This people honors me with their lips,
but their hearts are far from me;
in vain do they worship me,
teaching as doctrines human precepts.
You disregard God’s commandment but cling to human tradition.”He summoned the crowd again and said to them,
“Hear me, all of you, and understand.
Nothing that enters one from outside can defile that person;
but the things that come out from within are what defile.

“From within people, from their hearts,
come evil thoughts, unchastity, theft, murder,
adultery, greed, malice, deceit,
licentiousness, envy, blasphemy, arrogance, folly.
All these evils come from within and they defile.”

Reflection:

There is a tremendous challenge placed before us in this Sunday’s gospel by St. Mark.  The established religious leaders of Jesus’ time focused on the failure of Jesus’ disciples to wash their hands.  We all know that it is a good idea to wash our hands before we eat, but in Jesus’ day, failure to do so made a person sinful according to the Pharisees. To that complaint Jesus answers that religion must be a matter of the heart.  Only in keeping our hearts filled with compassion can we fulfill the law of Christ.

In the late 1990’s a book entitled Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff became quite popular in the “self-help” category.  The author was Richard Carlson, a clinical psychologist who had a significant following because of the talks and workshops he developed to help people keep their lives productive, well-adjusted and fulfilling.  In this weekend’s gospel, Jesus goes right to the matter of the heart, not the small stuff.  He taught about attitudes that his disciples should develop and live, every day of their lives.

In short, we should not sweat the small stuff, we should focus on the heart of our faith.  Love of God and love of neighbor should be our core values, our witness to the world.

Gospel Reflection Sep 2 – Sr. Teresa

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Sunday, September 2
 
Twenty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time
Gospel:
When the Pharisees with some scribes who had come from Jerusalem
gathered around Jesus,
they observed that some of his disciples ate their meals
with unclean, that is, unwashed, hands.
-For the Pharisees and, in fact, all Jews,
do not eat without carefully washing their hands,
keeping the tradition of the elders.
And on coming from the marketplace
they do not eat without purifying themselves.
And there are many other things that they have traditionally observed,
the purification of cups and jugs and kettles and beds. –
So the Pharisees and scribes questioned him,
“Why do your disciples not follow the tradition of the elders
but instead eat a meal with unclean hands?”
He responded,
“Well did Isaiah prophesy about you hypocrites, as it is written:
This people honors me with their lips,
but their hearts are far from me;
in vain do they worship me,
teaching as doctrines human precepts.
You disregard God’s commandment but cling to human tradition.”

He summoned the crowd again and said to them,
“Hear me, all of you, and understand.
Nothing that enters one from outside can defile that person;
but the things that come out from within are what defile.

“From within people, from their hearts,
come evil thoughts, unchastity, theft, murder,
adultery, greed, malice, deceit,
licentiousness, envy, blasphemy, arrogance, folly.
All these evils come from within and they defile.”

 

Reflection:
In light of the news that has unfolded in our world about our church these past few weeks, the words of today’s gospel carry great impact.
The small group of Pharisees had evidently been sent from Jerusalem to see if the things they had been hearing about Jesus and his followers were true. We might say they were sent to catch Jesus and his disciples not following the rules! As he so often does, Jesus will turn things around and the Pharisees and each of us and our Church will be challenged. Jesus’ words will penetrate and confront us with a searching question: Are we following the teachings of Jesus?
As the passage goes on and we take the time to lift it up and see what is beneath the words, we find it will be bigger than what starts out as proper table etiquette.
These Pharisees were super vigilant in trying to catch Jesus and the disciples breaking with traditional practices. The traditions and customs had been so intertwined into the Jewish culture over many years, the Pharisees considered them to be as binding as the Law of Moses. Jesus is not so much against the practices as he is against making the practice equivalent to, and sometimes even greater than, the spirit of the Law.
This passage is asking us to look at the religious practices we engage in and observe regularly. Invitations to look at our lives to see if stringent external practices may have polluted our heart and soul, and we have made them more important than the spirit of God’s love and law.
The last verses made my blood run cold and my conscience go on high alert, especially in the midst of the shame and scandal rocking our church now.
He summoned the crowd again and said to them, “Hear me, all of you, and understand.
Nothing that enters one from outside can defile that person; but the things that come out from within are what defile.
“From within people, from their hearts, come evil thoughts, unchastity, theft, murder, adultery, greed, malice, deceit, licentiousness, envy, blasphemy, arrogance, folly. All these evils come from within and they defile.”
We received a “Listen up!” notice from Jesus. This is a “let me make myself perfectly clear, so there is no misunderstanding” message from Jesus. The list Jesus gave the Pharisees of his day could be the same today: sex, abuse of power, control, money, greed. Perhaps, like many of you, I am so distressed by the state of our country and our world. The horrific war in Syria and atrocities in Yemen rage on. The number of shootings in our schools continues to escalate. The growing rejection to offer asylum that we witnessed as far too many children were separated from their families (and still not reunited).   The growing rejection of migrants and immigrants seeking asylum frightens and angers me.
As painful as all of that chilling reality is, it has not cut my heart as deeply as the increasing exposition of the sexual scandal and abuse of ecclesial power in our church that has been kept hidden for decades. The past weeks have brought revelations of horrors inflicted on children and others by some in the Catholic clergy. The complicity of many in the church hierarchy in abusing their power by covering up the actions of the perpetrators but neglecting the survivors of the abuse shocks us. Such criminal and immoral acts have brought our church to its knees. Perhaps like you I am sickened by the reports that get worse each day. Perhaps like you, I feel emotions that range from intense anger, to the point of rage, to absolute powerlessness.
Many have expressed their intention to leave the church. Others have expressed a confusion and sorrow that comes when you lose trust and confidence in something or someone you deeply love. It seems critical for all of us to hold on to hope and to hold on to each other. Our trust in the church may be shattered or badly broken but don’t equate that with faith. Hold on to your faith in Christ Jesus. Jesus Christ is our center. Jesus Christ is our rock. Jesus Christ is the source of our hope.
For the past several weeks our gospels have focused on the most precious gift Jesus has given us — the gift of his Body and Blood. This is a gift he left us, not because we were worthy, but because he knew we would be hungry, over and over again. We are certainly very hungry right now. Hungry for forgiveness, hungry for understanding, hungry for compassion, hungry for wisdom, and hungry for hope and understanding, hungry to find the way to Jesus Christ. We are, in a very real sense, starving for the Bread of Life in these perilous times.
Indeed, our church has been brought to its knees in shame and disgrace because of the actions and behaviors of some. We must also be brought to our knees to offer deep prayer. It is a time, not to turn our back on the church, but a time to open our arms wider to embrace the deep teachings of Jesus. It is time to look on this horrific scandal with the eyes and heart of Jesus Christ. A scandal which will get worse before it gets better, because the problem is bigger than the scandal. The problem is systemic in scope. We will have to listen and heed the warning given in today’s gospel as Jesus reminded the group of Pharisees, and us, of Isaiah’s words:
           Well did Isaiah prophesy about you hypocrites, as it is written:
This people honors me with their lips,
but their hearts are far from me;
in vain do they worship me,
teaching as doctrines human precepts.
You disregard God’s commandment but cling to human tradition.”
These times will test our faith and erode our hope, unless we cling to Jesus Christ as we make the long and difficult journey back to the heart of God.
Today’s gospel calls us: as individuals, as a parish community, as a country and as a total Institutional Church to ask, “What is flowing out of our hearts and spoken from our lips, and lived in our behavior?”  
Today, in this gospel passage, Jesus invites us and gives us a very stern warning to step back and look to see if we are only giving lip service to God while our heart remains very far from God. If I faithfully go to Church and yet continue to hate my neighbor, cheat others or refuse to forgive others then I must ask if going to Mass is just lip service to the heart of the law.
If my lips say, “I love my neighbor and care for the needy,” but I still ruthlessly accumulate power and material possessions at the expense of others, then I must ask myself if I am just giving lip service to the social teachings of my faith. I may choose to say extra prayers for peace and reconciliation and yet, ignore how I use my attitudes and words to hurt others. If I make it a practice to frequently receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation, but I am more diligent in doing or saying my penance than I am in changing my behavior toward self or others, am I being faithful? If I profess that we are temples of the Holy Spirit and yet turn my eyes from the escalating sickness of human trafficking, does that make my words meaningless?   If I pray the Our Father and yet I demonstrate prejudice toward others who are not like me, forgetting that we are brother and sister to all, is the prayer mere lip service?
If as a Church we fail to do all that we can to protect our children and fail to faithfully exercise the authority entrusted to us in Jesus’ name, should we not be held accountable?
If we look closely at this passage from Mark, we discover that there is a little bit of Pharisee in each of us. The sexual scandal and gross misuse of ecclesial power has shown us that there is a lot of Pharisee in our Institutional Church.  It is time to pay close attention to Jesus’ instruction and “Listen up!” It is time to pay very close attention to what comes from our heart and what is shown in our actions and heard in our words. It is time to depollute, not only as individuals, but as an Institutional Church, our attitudes, our behaviors, our inner and outer prejudices and judgements. Let there be no mistake, the words of Jesus have made it very clear today. We are responsible and must be held accountable. No one is above or exempt from the words of Jesus given to us in today’s gospel.
Sister Teresa Tuite, OP