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Allie Wing

Gospel Reflection Apr 30 – Deacon Don

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Sunday, April 30

Third Sunday of Easter

Luke 24: 13 – 35

Gospel:
That very day, the first day of the week,
two of Jesus’ disciples were going
to a village seven miles from Jerusalem called Emmaus,
and they were conversing about all the things that had occurred.
And it happened that while they were conversing and debating,
Jesus himself drew near and walked with them,
but their eyes were prevented from recognizing him.
He asked them,
“What are you discussing as you walk along?”
They stopped, looking downcast.
One of them, named Cleopas, said to him in reply,
“Are you the only visitor to Jerusalem
who does not know of the things
that have taken place there in these days?”
And he replied to them, “What sort of things?”
They said to him,
“The things that happened to Jesus the Nazarene,
who was a prophet mighty in deed and word
before God and all the people,
how our chief priests and rulers both handed him over
to a sentence of death and crucified him.
But we were hoping that he would be the one to redeem Israel;
and besides all this,
it is now the third day since this took place.
Some women from our group, however, have astounded us:
they were at the tomb early in the morning
and did not find his body;
they came back and reported
that they had indeed seen a vision of angels
who announced that he was alive.
Then some of those with us went to the tomb
and found things just as the women had described,
but him they did not see.”
And he said to them, “Oh, how foolish you are!
How slow of heart to believe all that the prophets spoke!
Was it not necessary that the Christ should suffer these things
and enter into his glory?”
Then beginning with Moses and all the prophets,
he interpreted to them what referred to him
in all the Scriptures.
As they approached the village to which they were going,
he gave the impression that he was going on farther.
But they urged him, “Stay with us,
for it is nearly evening and the day is almost over.”
So he went in to stay with them.
And it happened that, while he was with them at table,
he took bread, said the blessing,
broke it, and gave it to them.
With that their eyes were opened and they recognized him,
but he vanished from their sight.
Then they said to each other,
“Were not our hearts burning within us
while he spoke to us on the way and opened the Scriptures to us?”
So they set out at once and returned to Jerusalem
where they found gathered together
the eleven and those with them who were saying,
“The Lord has truly been raised and has appeared to Simon!”
Then the two recounted
what had taken place on the way
and how he was made known to them in the breaking of bread.
Reflection:
May the blessings of Our Lord be with you as we continue this Easter Season!

It seems almost laughable that two guys would be hiking down the road together, meet up and continue their walk with Jesus – the subject of their highly energized conversation – and not recognize that Jesus was walking with them. Perhaps their combined emotions of excitement, grief, and sorrow had made them blind to that fact. They were totally focused on their grief and the awesome events that had just taken place. How could these men be that blind? We too can easily get caught up in the moment and be equally blind to Jesus’ presence in our lives.

There is a saying that you don’t see with your eyes or hear with your ears. Eyes simply diffuse light and ears simply receive audible noise. It is our brains that process what we see and hear and our intellect that determines if and how we might respond. Our brains can only process about one or two things at a time, so whatever pre-occupies us must necessarily push out other possibilities. So it might have been this way with these two men. They were so caught up in their emotions that the most important moment of their lives almost entirely escaped their grasp. Luckily for them, their brains caught up with the drama that unfolded. It was Jesus’ breaking of the bread that rattled their brains away from their grief and back into the moment. They were filled with joy as their eyes were opened with the Body of Jesus. When the disciples finally realized who was with them, Jesus left instantly. The bread, now his Body, became the suitable replacement, equal in value, equal in substance, and equal in reality. As joy replaced sorrow and grief for these men, so it should be with us.

How often and how easily can we get caught up in our daily grind and other day-to-day busyness that are of little or lasting importance. Our brain can easily be distracted with television, news, and social media – all forcing out thoughts of Jesus’ presence in our lives. He is here! He is Risen! He is with us now and forever! Do we give ourselves enough time to wrap our brains around that? His presence with us in the breaking of the bread and hearing His word remains with us today just as it did for those two guys hiking to Emmaus so long ago.

Let us continue this Easter Season with the joy that comes with His presence in Word and in Sacrament!
Deacon Don Poirier

Gospel Reflection Apr 23 – Deacon Frank

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Sunday, April 23

Second Sunday of Easter

John 20: 19 – 31

Gospel:
On the evening of that first day of the week,
when the doors were locked, where the disciples were,
for fear of the Jews,
Jesus came and stood in their midst
and said to them, “Peace be with you.”
When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his side.
The disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord.
Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you.
As the Father has sent me, so I send you.”
And when he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them,
“Receive the Holy Spirit.
Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them,
and whose sins you retain are retained.”

Thomas, called Didymus, one of the Twelve,
was not with them when Jesus came.
So the other disciples said to him, “We have seen the Lord.”
But he said to them,
“Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands
and put my finger into the nailmarks
and put my hand into his side, I will not believe.”

Now a week later his disciples were again inside
and Thomas was with them.
Jesus came, although the doors were locked,
and stood in their midst and said, “Peace be with you.”
Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here and see my hands,
and bring your hand and put it into my side,
and do not be unbelieving, but believe.”
Thomas answered and said to him, “My Lord and my God!”
Jesus said to him, “Have you come to believe because you have seen me?
Blessed are those who have not seen and have believed.”

Now, Jesus did many other signs in the presence of his disciples
that are not written in this book.
But these are written that you may come to believe
that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God,
and that through this belief you may have life in his name.
Reflection:
This weekend when you go to Mass you will hear the familiar story of ‘Doubting Thomas’. As you are aware, Thomas the Apostle is called that because he refused to believe the other disciples when they told him they had seen the Risen Lord. On hearing of the visit he said ‘No way! ‘Or, as the text reports, “…unless I see the mark of the nails in His hands and put my finger in His side, I will not believe.’ When Jesus appeared and told Thomas to put His finger and hand into his wounds, the Gospel passage says Thomas responded with “My Lord and my God!’ Of course he believed. Who wouldn’t?

Today Jesus doesn’t appear to us and tell us to touch His wounds. As He invites Thomas to do just that, He proclaims a message that may be a source of hope for all of us. “Blessed are those who have not seen and have believed. ” Yes, Jesus was talking about us – about you and me. We are blessed because we believe in Him even though we have not seen. We are blessed.

Think of the people whom you know in your life who make Jesus the Christ known in how they live and in how they are with others. In seeing them we see Jesus. We must remind ourselves that Jesus is in these people around us. And going one step further, we must ask ourselves if others ever see or experience Jesus in us. In you. In me.

Sometime this week look into a mirror; look into your eyes reflected back at you. Ask Jesus to reflect His face, His life, and His love to others. And remember that when Jesus is with you, so much is possible.

Deacon Frank Iannarino

Gospel Reflection Apr 16 – Sr. Teresa

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Sunday, April 16

The Resurrection of the Lord

Matthew 28: 1 – 10

Gospel:
After the sabbath, as the first day of the week was dawning,
Mary Magdalene and the other Mary came to see the tomb.
And behold, there was a great earthquake;
for an angel of the Lord descended from heaven,
approached, rolled back the stone, and sat upon it.
His appearance was like lightning
and his clothing was white as snow.
The guards were shaken with fear of him
and became like dead men.
Then the angel said to the women in reply,
“Do not be afraid!
I know that you are seeking Jesus the crucified.
He is not here, for he has been raised just as he said.
Come and see the place where he lay.
Then go quickly and tell his disciples,
‘He has been raised from the dead,
and he is going before you to Galilee;
there you will see him.’
Behold, I have told you.”
Then they went away quickly from the tomb,
fearful yet overjoyed,
and ran to announce this to his disciples.
And behold, Jesus met them on their way and greeted them.
They approached, embraced his feet, and did him homage.
Then Jesus said to them, “Do not be afraid.
Go tell my brothers to go to Galilee,
and there they will see me.”

Reflection:
I feel a bit discombobulated as I sit typing out my gospel reflection. It is Tuesday of Holy Week but I am supposed to be reflecting on the gospel offered to us for Easter Sunday, to tell again of the miracle of the Resurrection.

Last Sunday we celebrated Palm Sunday and welcomed Jesus into the holy city of Jerusalem. Before the week was out this man to whom we shouted songs of praise gave us the gift of his Body and Blood (so that we would be forever nourished by the gift of his life) then he was crucified on a cross. By the end of the week the parade would be very different. It would be a parade of very few people taking the body of Jesus to be laid in a borrowed tomb.

As a world community, we are held in the terror of warfare. On April 4th, at least 70 people were killed in Tuesday’s attack, which witnesses described as a fog of chemicals that enveloped men, women and children, leaving many to suffocate, choke or foam at the mouth. In horror, I looked at the young father who held his twin babies. They died along with his wife, two brothers, two nephews and a niece. There is no difficulty entering the horrors of Good Friday and seeing the connection to the horrors of warfare and to again witness the inhumanity shown to each other.

We know the emptiness of Holy Saturday because I think we live so much of life in “Holy-Saturday mode.” It is the in-between time. The time between a sense of hopelessness and hope; between the known and unknown. Repeatedly we live the Easter Mystery of life, death and resurrection but it is the time in-between that we try to grapple with.

The celebrant could choose the passage from the gospel according to John or according to Matthew. I chose the piece from Matthew.

Mary Magdalene and “the other Mary”, two women who had been there when Jesus was placed in the tomb and the tomb sealed with a very heavy stone. When everyone else had left, it was these two women who remained and kept vigil. They witness the angel rolling back the stone. They see the guards paralyzed with fear. Mary Magdalene and the other Mary were afraid but not paralyzed and were open to the mission given to them. “then go quickly and tell the disciples, ‘He has been raised from the dead.” They leave the tomb “fearful yet overjoyed.”

I think we know these women; we have, most undoubtedly walked in their shoes. Like them they could not prevent what happened to Jesus. We cannot change, as hard as we may try, the tragic course of events: a fatal illness, a marriage breakup, the death of a loved one, the downward decline of an addiction, a refugee crisis nor acts of chemical warfare. So often something breaks through that horror and sorrow and we are faced with a choice – be paralyzed and do nothing or work through our fear and sorrow and do what we can do to move toward new life.

These two women are the first witnesses to the resurrection and the first chosen for an Easter mission, “Then go quickly and tell his disciples.” In that one act, the history of the world was changed forever.

“The resurrection has changed the world forever.” We cannot focus on the resurrection alone – it is part of a bigger piece. It is part of the life, death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Through all of this we have hope now for new life in God

Through Jesus’ resurrection we all have been raised and now the mission is ours … go out and tell others about Jesus Christ. Be witnesses to his life, to his death and crucifixion and to his resurrection. Cling to hope in the in-between-times of life. Hold fast to hope when what is taken for normal is broken and shattered. Give witness and respond to the needs of others. The Risen Jesus is in our midst especially in our neighbor, the hungry, the prisoner, the thirsty and the lonely. Do you not recognize him? He has Risen and lives and gives our mission. The resurrected Jesus sends each one of us to go out to others. SO – “don’t be afraid,” go out and spread the word!!

-Sr. Teresa Tuite

Gospel Reflection Apr 9 – Msgr. Hendricks + Rice Bowl Week 6

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Sunday, April 2

Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion

Matthew 27: 11 – 54

Gospel:
Jesus stood before the governor, Pontius Pilate, who questioned him,
“Are you the king of the Jews?”
Jesus said, “You say so.”
And when he was accused by the chief priests and elders,
he made no answer.
Then Pilate said to him,
“Do you not hear how many things they are testifying against you?”
But he did not answer him one word,
so that the governor was greatly amazed.

Now on the occasion of the feast
the governor was accustomed to release to the crowd
one prisoner whom they wished.
And at that time they had a notorious prisoner called Barabbas.
So when they had assembled, Pilate said to them,
“Which one do you want me to release to you,
Barabbas, or Jesus called Christ?”
For he knew that it was out of envy
that they had handed him over.
While he was still seated on the bench,
his wife sent him a message,
“Have nothing to do with that righteous man.
I suffered much in a dream today because of him.”
The chief priests and the elders persuaded the crowds
to ask for Barabbas but to destroy Jesus.
The governor said to them in reply,
“Which of the two do you want me to release to you?”
They answered, “Barabbas!”
Pilate said to them,
“Then what shall I do with Jesus called Christ?”
They all said,
“Let him be crucified!”
But he said,
“Why? What evil has he done?”
They only shouted the louder,
“Let him be crucified!”
When Pilate saw that he was not succeeding at all,
but that a riot was breaking out instead,
he took water and washed his hands in the sight of the crowd,
saying, “I am innocent of this man’s blood.
Look to it yourselves.”
And the whole people said in reply,
“His blood be upon us and upon our children.”
Then he released Barabbas to them,
but after he had Jesus scourged,
he handed him over to be crucified.

Then the soldiers of the governor took Jesus inside the praetorium
and gathered the whole cohort around him.
They stripped off his clothes
and threw a scarlet military cloak about him.
Weaving a crown out of thorns, they placed it on his head,
and a reed in his right hand.
And kneeling before him, they mocked him, saying,
“Hail, King of the Jews!”
They spat upon him and took the reed
and kept striking him on the head.
And when they had mocked him,
they stripped him of the cloak,
dressed him in his own clothes,
and led him off to crucify him.

As they were going out, they met a Cyrenian named Simon;
this man they pressed into service
to carry his cross.

And when they came to a place called Golgotha
– which means Place of the Skull -,
they gave Jesus wine to drink mixed with gall.
But when he had tasted it, he refused to drink.
After they had crucified him,
they divided his garments by casting lots;
then they sat down and kept watch over him there.
And they placed over his head the written charge against him:
This is Jesus, the King of the Jews.
Two revolutionaries were crucified with him,
one on his right and the other on his left.
Those passing by reviled him, shaking their heads and saying,
“You who would destroy the temple and rebuild it in three days,
save yourself, if you are the Son of God,
and come down from the cross!”
Likewise the chief priests with the scribes and elders mocked him and said,
“He saved others; he cannot save himself.
So he is the king of Israel!
Let him come down from the cross now,
and we will believe in him.
He trusted in God;
let him deliver him now if he wants him.
For he said, ‘I am the Son of God.'”
The revolutionaries who were crucified with him
also kept abusing him in the same way.

From noon onward, darkness came over the whole land
until three in the afternoon.
And about three o’clock Jesus cried out in a loud voice,
“Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?”
which means, “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?”
Some of the bystanders who heard it said,
“This one is calling for Elijah.”
Immediately one of them ran to get a sponge;
he soaked it in wine, and putting it on a reed,
gave it to him to drink.
But the rest said,
‘Wait, let us see if Elijah comes to save him.”
But Jesus cried out again in a loud voice,
and gave up his spirit.

Here all kneel and pause for a short time.

And behold, the veil of the sanctuary
was torn in two from top to bottom.
The earth quaked, rocks were split, tombs were opened,
and the bodies of many saints who had fallen asleep were raised.
And coming forth from their tombs after his resurrection,
they entered the holy city and appeared to many.
The centurion and the men with him who were keeping watch over Jesus
feared greatly when they saw the earthquake
and all that was happening, and they said,
“Truly, this was the Son of God!”

Reflection:
Today the Church begins Holy Week. Palm Sunday marks the time when Jesus enters the Holy City Jerusalem, to begin his victory over sin and death.

Although the gospel this Sunday is an account of His Passion by St. Matthew, the real key to our understanding of this wondrous gift is in the second reading from St. Paul’s letter to the Philippians. It is here that we learn that Jesus is the Christ, the anointed of the Lord, and at the mention of His name all on heaven and earth fall down in adoration. This reminds us of the beginning of His life when the Magi come to offer their gifts to Him. They give the best they have for the new born king. We offer our best as he promised us new life with Him in heaven.

Our response is to hear and accept the message of the gospel, reflect on it this Holy Week and come to conversion as we follow Him through the valley of death to the newness of the resurrection.

Have a great Holy Week!
Monsignor Hendricks
OPERATION RICE BOWL: WEEK 6

Global Solidarity
Catholic social teaching inspires and guides how we are to live and work in the world. In this principle, Global Solidarity, Jesus tells us to love our neighbors, even though they may be different than us. That means the neighbors who live next door and also those who live on the other side of the planet. Jesus reminds us that we are all part of God’s great family.
Encounter Our Neighbors
You are born with breadfruit, you grow up with breadfruit and you die with breadfruit. This popular saying from the Micronesian island of Chuuk, thousands of miles off the coast of Hawaii, captures the importance of this starchy fruit. It’s a staple both for the Chuukese living in Micronesia, and for people like Micaela, who were forced to migrate to Hawaii due to a changing climate and rising seas.

Though Micaela moved to Hawaii seeking a better life, she instead found a community of Chuukese struggling with hunger. Through the One ‘Ohana: Food and Housing for All program, Micaela organizes groups of women to learn farming techniques. Together, they gain the knowledge to plant breadfruit trees and feed their communities.

For Micaela, the project is a way to look to the future while remembering the past. “It’s been many years since I dug my hands in the ground. We are reconnecting back to our home, even though it’s not the soil from where we came from,” she says.

Watch a 3 ½ minute video to learn more about the One ‘Ohana: Food and Housing for All program: http://www.officeforsocialministry.org/one_ohana_food_housing_for_all/

Gospel Reflection Apr 2 – Fr. Morris + Rice Bowl Week 5

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Sunday, April 2

Fifth Sunday of Lent

John 11:3-7, 17, 20-27, 33B-45

Gospel:
The sisters of Lazarus sent word to Jesus, saying,
“Master, the one you love is ill.”
When Jesus heard this he said,
“This illness is not to end in death,
but is for the glory of God,
that the Son of God may be glorified through it.”
Now Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus.
So when he heard that he was ill,
he remained for two days in the place where he was.
Then after this he said to his disciples,
“Let us go back to Judea.”

When Jesus arrived, he found that Lazarus
had already been in the tomb for four days.
When Martha heard that Jesus was coming,
she went to meet him;
but Mary sat at home.
Martha said to Jesus,
“Lord, if you had been here,
my brother would not have died.
But even now I know that whatever you ask of God,
God will give you.”
Jesus said to her,
“Your brother will rise.”
Martha said,
“I know he will rise,
in the resurrection on the last day.”
Jesus told her,
“I am the resurrection and the life;
whoever believes in me, even if he dies, will live,
and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die.
Do you believe this?”
She said to him, “Yes, Lord.
I have come to believe that you are the Christ, the Son of God,
the one who is coming into the world.”

He became perturbed and deeply troubled, and said,
“Where have you laid him?”
They said to him, “Sir, come and see.”
And Jesus wept.
So the Jews said, “See how he loved him.”
But some of them said,
“Could not the one who opened the eyes of the blind man
have done something so that this man would not have died?”

So Jesus, perturbed again, came to the tomb.
It was a cave, and a stone lay across it.
Jesus said, “Take away the stone.”
Martha, the dead man’s sister, said to him,
“Lord, by now there will be a stench;
he has been dead for four days.”
Jesus said to her,
“Did I not tell you that if you believe
you will see the glory of God?”
So they took away the stone.
And Jesus raised his eyes and said,
“Father, I thank you for hearing me.
I know that you always hear me;
but because of the crowd here I have said this,
that they may believe that you sent me.”
And when he had said this,
He cried out in a loud voice,
“Lazarus, come out!”
The dead man came out,
tied hand and foot with burial bands,
and his face was wrapped in a cloth.
So Jesus said to them,
“Untie him and let him go.”

Now many of the Jews who had come to Mary
and seen what he had done began to believe in him.

Reflection:
Today’s Gospel includes the answer to a common trivia question: what is the shortest verse of the Bible? It’s a trick question if asked by a biblical scholar, because they will tell you it is Luke 20:30 in the original Greek texts. But the answer that is usually intended is the shortest verse of the famous King James Version translation, which is “Jesus wept.”

This text is interesting not only for its brevity but for its dogmatic import. There were some people in the early centuries of the Church who could not understand how Jesus could be both God and Man. They taught that either Jesus was God but not truly human, or that he was a very holy man but not divine. The Church rebutted these erroneous ideas in ecumenical council, and held faithfully to the teaching of the Apostles: no matter how hard it is for us to grasp, Jesus is truly God and truly Man.

Our Gospel passage for today affirms this great truth. In a very real and physical way, the Second Person of the Trinity, by His Incarnation, has wept tears of grief. God has truly wept for His loved ones. Even though Our Lord knew He would soon raise Lazarus, that did not stop Him from feeling the full weight of grief, of experiencing the loss of His dear friend.

Jesus not only wept, but even as He steps before the tomb to perform His miracle, the Evangelist tells us that He was “perturbed again” (“deeply moved,” “groaning,” in other translations). Jesus’ face was still wet with grief even as He prepared to call Lazarus forth from the grave. And so we can be sure that Jesus is there with us in our weeping as we lay our loved ones to rest. Even though we know they will rise again at the Last Day, we still feel the full weight of grief and loss.

We should not be ashamed of or fight our grief. In our tears, we are merely following the example of Our Lord Himself.
Father Morris
OPERATION RICE BOWL: WEEK 5

Care for God’s Creation
Catholic social teaching inspires and guides how we are to live and work in the world. In this principle, Care for God’s Creation, we remember that God created every plant, every mountaintop, every animal — everything. And God said that these things are good. We find God in these good things, and so we must take care of creation, both for ourselves and for all of our human family.

Encounter Dita
Dita, her husband and their seven children depend on the money they earn selling crops from their small farm in Ethiopia. But frequent droughts often mean that families like Dita’s who depend on home-grown crops go hungry. And amidst the current, historic drought, more than 10 million people are struggling with hunger.
But thanks to a CRS program that helps families prepare for crises like droughts, Dita was able to build a new house and open a small store. Instead of relying solely on what she can grow on her farm, she is able to sell items like pasta, shampoo and bananas. She earns a steady $400 a month.

“Before, I had to get eggs from my neighbors. Now I have 15 hens,” she proclaims. Saving money and being able to borrow not only allowed her to buy hens but also a metal roof for her new house, a rarity for families in this part of Ethiopia.

“Now we have no problems with food,” she says. Unlike families across Ethiopia that struggle to find enough to eat, Dita says her children eat three times a day, thanks to her newfound business knowledge.

And what’s more, all her children are attending school. “When I was a child, there were no education opportunities,” she says. Then, with a shy but proud smile, she adds, “That’s a big difference.”

Follow the link to learn more about CRS’ work in Ethiopia. http://www.crs.org/our-work-overseas/where-we-work/ethiopia?_ga=1.48200420.21127280.1453232487
Try a simple meal from Ethiopia: Injera with atkilt wat. http://www.crsricebowl.org/recipes/injera-with-atkilt-wat

“From Homeless to Home”

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Pope Francis, in his message for Lent 2017 reminds us that “Lent is a favorable season for opening the doors to all those in need and recognizing in them the face of Christ.”  Among those most in need are the men, women and children who are homeless.

Many years ago, the Diocese of Columbus was involved in the formation of the Community Shelter Board as the entity that would coordinate our community’s response to homelessness.  The Community Shelter Board (CSB) makes an impact in three ways; Bringing partners together to work as an efficient system, employing a performance based funding model and implementing best practice based programs that effectively house people in crisis.  CSB programs serve over 12,000 people a year.

CSB is continuing its “From Homeless to Home” campaign during the Lenten Season.  This campaign is designed to find permanent homes for men, women and children experiencing homelessness in central Ohio.  Money and materials raised during the campaign support CSB programs that move people out of homelessness and into secure and affordable housing.

Please consider Contributing to CSB.  Information is available at www.fromhomelesstohome.org.

Gospel Reflection Mar 26 – Deacon Paul + Rice Bowl Week 4

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Sunday, March 26

Fourth Sunday of Lent

John 9:1, 6-9, 13-17, 34-38

Gospel:
As Jesus passed by he saw a man blind from birth.
He spat on the ground and made clay with the saliva,
and smeared the clay on his eyes, and said to him,
“Go wash in the Pool of Siloam” – which means Sent -.
So he went and washed, and came back able to see.

His neighbors and those who had seen him earlier as a beggar said,
“Isn’t this the one who used to sit and beg?”
Some said, “It is, ”
but others said, “No, he just looks like him.”
He said, “I am.”

They brought the one who was once blind to the Pharisees.
Now Jesus had made clay and opened his eyes on a sabbath.
So then the Pharisees also asked him how he was able to see.
He said to them,
“He put clay on my eyes, and I washed, and now I can see.”
So some of the Pharisees said,
“This man is not from God,
because he does not keep the sabbath.”
But others said,
“How can a sinful man do such signs?”
And there was a division among them.
So they said to the blind man again,
“What do you have to say about him,
since he opened your eyes?”
He said, “He is a prophet.”

They answered and said to him,
“You were born totally in sin,
and are you trying to teach us?”
Then they threw him out.

When Jesus heard that they had thrown him out,
he found him and said, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?”
He answered and said,
“Who is he, sir, that I may believe in him?”
Jesus said to him,
“You have seen him, and
the one speaking with you is he.”
He said,
“I do believe, Lord,” and he worshiped him.

Reflection:
In today’s Gospel, we hear the story of the healing of the blind man. John says that as Jesus was walking along he saw the man who was born blind. Without being asked, Jesus performs the miracle.

The man was physically blind but now he sees. At the same time, there is a gradual progression from spiritual blindness to sight, or from darkness to light. The blind man’s Christological insight grew and continued to grow as the story progresses. He started out by calling Jesus a man, then a prophet. He affirms that Jesus cannot be a sinner but that He is from God.

The story does not end here with the blind man that was healed. Jesus has not abandoned him. Jesus finds him when he is at the most vulnerable point of his life and asks him if he believes in the Son of Man. The blind man receives his sight, a miracle in the physical realm. But much more significantly, his spiritual eyes are opened and his darkness turns to light as he falls on his knees before Jesus and says, “Lord, I believe.”

So, during this Lenten Season, what is causing your “spiritual” blindness? How can we best sharpen our “spiritual” vision to be 20/20? Some potential ways are to go to Vespers on Sunday nights, Soup Suppers and Stations of the Cross on Tuesday nights, go to a Taize prayer service, receive the Sacrament of Reconciliation, and most importantly receive the Sacrament of Holy Eucharist regularly. God wants us to have a very clear and bright spiritual vision, about Himself, and about each other, and about ourselves. Let Jesus perform a miracle with you this Lent so you may see more clearly the glory of God.

Deacon Paul Zemanek
OPERATION RICE BOWL: WEEK 4

Call to Family, Community and Participation
Catholic social teaching inspires and guides how we are to live and work in the world. In this principle, Call to Family, Community and Participation, we remember that human beings are social by nature — we need each other. We, like the early disciples, are called to come together and grow as a community, whether that community is in our classroom, workplace or family.

Encounter Maria
Maria de la Luz Lugo Martínez remembers what it was like growing up in Ejido Hidalgo, Mexico. “We said we were rich because we had a lot of corn, beans and animals.” But now, with few jobs and even less rain, young people — including Maria’s children — are leaving the community in search of a better life.

To help families like Maria’s, CRS launched a greenhouse project empowering women with meaningful work and community. Women visit their community greenhouses to grow cactuses to sell, but they also go for so much more. “At the greenhouses, we laugh, we talk, we spend time together. Sometimes we leave our homes angry or sad. But then we start working with the plants, and we forget. Talking, laughing, we forget our problems for a while,” says Maria.

As the cactuses grow, so too do the economic opportunities. “We didn’t believe we were going to get that far. It’s a lot of joy, a lot of excitement to see so many plants flowering.”

The flourishing cactuses aren’t the only things that give Maria pride. Even though they live far away, she still remains close to her family. “I give thanks to God that he gave me all my children and grandchildren,” she says. “They give me strength and courage to work hard. My children call and say, ‘Don’t give up, Mom. Have faith in God.'”

Watch a short video to learn more about Maria and the work of CRS in Mexico. http://www.crsricebowl.org/stories-of-hope/week-4 You might also want to try a very easy and delicious recipe from Mexico. http://www.crsricebowl.org/recipes/arroz-rojo

Men’s Bible Study – Encountering Jesus

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Join Sister Teresa and some men of St. Brigid for another opportunity of Encountering Jesus.  We will use a DVD series called: Who Is This Man? 

We will meet for five Tuesdays in May from 7-8:30PM:

May 2    The Man Who Won’t Go Away-Immke Room

May 9     A Revolution of Humanity – Immke Room

May 16   The Power of Forgiveness – Immke Room

May 23    Why It’s a Small World after All –Immke Room

May 30   Three Days that Changed the World –Immke Room

We need at least 10 men so you have to register by April 25th.

Email:ttuite@stbrigidofkildare.org or call the Parish Office

614-761-3734  I need your name and a way to contact you

with more information. –Sister Teresa