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Allie Wing

Gospel Reflection Nov 18 – Sr. Teresa

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Gospel Reflection
November 18, 2018

Sunday, November 18

Thirty-third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mark 13: 24 – 32

Gospel:
Jesus said to his disciples:
“In those days after that tribulation
the sun will be darkened,
and the moon will not give its light,
and the stars will be falling from the sky,
and the powers in the heavens will be shaken.

“And then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in the clouds’
with great power and glory,
and then he will send out the angels
and gather his elect from the four winds,
from the end of the earth to the end of the sky.

“Learn a lesson from the fig tree.
When its branch becomes tender and sprouts leaves,
you know that summer is near.
In the same way, when you see these things happening,
know that he is near, at the gates.
Amen, I say to you,
this generation will not pass away
until all these things have taken place.
Heaven and earth will pass away,
but my words will not pass away.

“But of that day or hour, no one knows,
neither the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.”

Reflection:
We are coming to the end of the liturgical year. It will end on November 25th, the Feast of Christ the King. Whenever things are drawing to a close we look at the things that need to be tended to and the things that need to end. It is a time to step back, stand still, rethink and re-prioritize. It is a time for “new resolutions.” Keeping that ending in mind, this weekend and next weekend the readings remind us that the world is passing away; it must pass away. It is also a time, at least in our part of the world, when darkness has overtaken the light – despite our effort of “daylight savings time.”

The readings for the next two weekends are examples of apocalyptic literary genre. It is very evident in the reading from Daniel and from the Gospel according to Mark. The word “apocalypse” comes from the Greek language and means “to lift the veil.” A friend of mine put it this way: “Apocalyptic literature suggests what we think we see as true and as reality, in fact, may be obscured by veils. We think we see – but we don’t. We think we know the truth and the way things are – but we don’t. We need vision; we need the veil over our own eyes lifted so we can clearly perceive God’s presence and God’s future coming into our world.”

These readings convey a sense of the “end times.” In the past few months, after hurricanes, tsunamis, uncontrolled fires, volcanoes erupting, mass shootings, etc., I have heard people say, “these are all signs that the end is near.” It is a time when groups we sometimes refer to as Doomsayers come forward to proclaim that the end of the world is imminent.

Apocalyptic writing was never meant to be taken literally. It does not contain secret codes that only a few people know, nor is it meant to predict the future. It is meant to convey hope for people. If we look back over our lives, we will see times when we thought our world was coming to an end. It could have been the death of a loved one, loss of a job, diagnosis of a very serious illness. All kinds of situations when it seemed as if our life was nothing but chaos and it seemed as if God has abandoned us or forgotten us. Most of us, if not all, have experienced dark times in our life and may have wondered if there would ever be any light again. The times when it seems as if everything we trusted in was falling apart. Those times feel very much like the “end times” for us. Times when we wondered if God would live up to God’s promise to be with us always. Or if trusting in God is actually possible? It is so hard to live through the dark times of life; the times when we can see no signs of God’s presence. It is hard to hold onto hope.

Some may feel that way as you read this … maybe things are falling apart in your personal life; some feel that the political situation and climate in our country or in our church seems dismal and in total chaos, feel that that their lives have no signs of light and are surrounded only by darkness. Some may feel that they have hit rock bottom and there is no hope.
The writers using apocalyptic writing style are saying – WAIT! WAIT! God is in charge and goodness and life will win. Hope is always possible. Trusting in God is possible. Believing that God is always faithful is real. God is always in charge. Gradually, we will begin to feel the glimmer of hope begin to burn within us. It might take a lot of fanning for it to get going and we may need others to help us, but hope will prevail. We will begin to see new life, we will begin to move out of the darkness of chaos into the light.

If you have time, go to YouTube and put in Dare Not Fear to Hope – a video reflection. Just sit quietly and listen to the words. One of my favorite verses goes like this: “Do not fear to hope, for though the night be long, the race shall not be to the swift; the fight not to the strong. Look to God when victory seems out of justice’s sight. Look to God whose mighty hand brought forth the day from the chaos of the night.”

Apocalyptic writing is not meant to scare the begeebers out of us (even though some preachers use it that way). It is to give us reason to hope. It “lifts the veil” so that we can see for certain that God is in charge. “In the end everything will be alright. If it is not alright, then it is not the end.” John Lennon

Today we gather, as a faith community and we celebrate God’s constant presence among us – in each other, in the Word and in the Gift of God’s Body and Blood. We gather to be given the food we need to go forth and believe that whatever endings we face, the Spirit will be with us. We gather to lean on each other, to be signs of hope to each other. Don’t worry about the “end of the world” that is God’s prerogative. The world is always coming to an end. We only have today. God is always here and at the same time always coming. Today is the only day we have to “dare to hope.” Today is the only day we have to be faithful.

Sister Teresa Tuite, OP

Men’s Cornerstone Retreat

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The Men’s Cornerstone Retreat has grown over the last 8 years. Cornerstone X is for Men of St. Brigid who feel called to ignite, grow or renew their spiritual faith. The Cornerstone Retreat, with the theme “Mission Possible—Take the Next Step” will start at 5pm on Friday, January 25th, and will end on Sunday, January 27th by 12 noon. The Retreat is being held at the St. Therese Retreat Center in Columbus, OH. The facility and food are incredible with every participant getting his own room. The Retreat is organized, planned and executed by the men of our parish. No matter where you are on your faith journey you will be comfortable and find the content and activities engaging. Come and develop a relationship with 50 other men in our parish through fellowship. Space is limited so sign up early. Register online using a credit card at stbrigidofkildare.org. Please contact Jason Hazen at jasonhazen13@gmail.com.

Click here to register.

Walk through the Liturgy with Bishop Barron

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Walk through the Liturgy with Bishop Barron and you’ll be transformed through insights on this most privileged and intimate encounter with our Lord Jesus Christ.  This seven week Study Program is one way to immerse yourself fully into the beauty and mystery of the principal act of Catholic worship and faith.
Sessions will be held from 7:00 pm – 8:30 p.m. in the Immke Room on January 10, 17, 24, 31 and February 7, 14 and 21.
Each session, after the introductory session, includes a video featuring Bishop Barron, questions for individual preparation at home and is followed by small group discussion and sharing.
Please register online by January 3, 2019 so study guide books may be ordered.  The $30.00 fee includes the cost of the Study Guide.

Click here to register. 

Women’s Bible Study – Messy People

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Our Women’s Bible Study is entitled Messy People – Life Lessons from Imperfect Bible Heroes by Jennifer Cowart.

Every life gets messy at times. Sometimes these messes are literal, such as a house that would be easier to condemn than to clean or a child who needs a fire hose instead of a tub. But sometimes our messes are harder to see. These life messes often carry the labels of illness, conflict, depression, abuse, bankruptcy, divorce, death of a loved one, or job loss. These life-situation messes are often very painful.

During this series, we will dig into the lives of biblical heroes who were messy people, too. We meet Rahab, the prodigal son, Josiah, Mary, David and Daniel.  Through them we learn how God gives them and us power to work through the difficult moments of life.  The series includes scripture study, reflection and prayer in five daily lessons to use at home each week.  Shared reflection and a video presentation and prayer is part of the weekly group session.

DATES

January 9 – Introduction (books will be available)

January 16 and 23, February 6, 13, 20 and 27

PLACE AND TIME                                   COST

Hendricks Hall -Immke Room             $20.00 (includes the book)

7:00 – 8:30 PM

Click here to register.

Gospel Reflection Nov 11 – Msgr. Hendricks

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Gospel Reflection
November 11, 2018

Sunday, November 11

Thirty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mark 12: 41 – 44

Gospel:
Jesus sat down opposite the treasury
and observed how the crowd put money into the treasury.
Many rich people put in large sums.
A poor widow also came and put in two small coins worth a few cents.
Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them,
“Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more
than all the other contributors to the treasury.
For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth,
but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had,
her whole livelihood.”

Reflection:
In the readings this Sunday, there are two widows. Both are poor and struggling to survive. The widow in the first reading has prepared to die and her son with her. The widow in the gospel while only able to give a few pennies is willing to part with all she has because she has placed her whole heart in the hands of God. For St. Mark this widow becomes a model of how to live fully for the Lord. The two women in the readings remain nameless because they are the lowest of the society of that time, with no one to care for them and without a future. They do what is necessary to empty themselves of everything for the sake of a higher calling, the one sees in the prophet Elijah, the messenger of God. The widow in the gospel today becomes a Christ figure, anticipating the self-emptying of Jesus on the Cross for our salvation.

The message for those who hear the word of God today is one of trust and self-emptying. Trust in the God who saves us regardless of our circumstances and self-emptying, of how we owe all we have to the one who created and then saved us.

We reflect on these two women and ask ourselves if we to can become a sign of hope and self-emptying in our world, our towns, our homes. What is it that we have to give, because of our faith in Christ, and will we give our all because of what has been given to us?

Monsignor Hendricks

Help CREW with Sunday Socials

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Help CREW with Sunday Socials

 

If you want first dibs on the breakfast treats, host a Sunday Social!
If you are looking for a family service opportunity, host a Sunday Social!
If you want to get involved at St. Brigid and meet new people along the way, host a Sunday Social!
Sound like fun?
All the little details are taken care of . . . we just need your helpful hands to set-up, serve and clean-up. Pick a Sunday that works for you, ready yourself, bring your family or coordinate with a group of friends and come be a part of the St. Brigid Parish community in a super easy way.
Additional details are provided in the sign-up link. If you are eager and willing to help, please sign up below.

Gospel Reflection Nov 4 – Fr. Morris

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Gospel Reflection
November 4, 2018

Sunday, November 4

Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mark 12: 28B – 34

Gospel:
One of the scribes came to Jesus and asked him,
“Which is the first of all the commandments?”
Jesus replied, “The first is this:
Hear, O Israel!
The Lord our God is Lord alone!
You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart,
with all your soul,
with all your mind,
and with all your strength.
The second is this:
You shall love your neighbor as yourself.
There is no other commandment greater than these.”
The scribe said to him, “Well said, teacher.
You are right in saying,
‘He is One and there is no other than he.’
And ‘to love him with all your heart,
with all your understanding,
with all your strength,
and to love your neighbor as yourself’
is worth more than all burnt offerings and sacrifices.”
And when Jesus saw that he answered with understanding,
he said to him,
“You are not far from the kingdom of God.”
And no one dared to ask him any more questions.

Reflection:
In this Sunday’s Gospel, we hear about the encounter between Jesus and an unnamed Jewish scribe. The fact that he is a scribe indicates he is a man with a rare level of literacy and specialized training. Even today, a good religious scribe is a precious resource. When a modern-day synagogue needs to purchase a new ritual-quality Torah scroll, it can expect to be quoted prices ranging from $20,000 to $60,000. That’s because a traditional sefer Torah scroll is completely handwritten. A specially-trained scribe, using quill and parchment, can labor up to a year in order to complete just one.

So this ancient scribe has probably handwritten the Commandments and other parts of the Torah many times over, laboring at the copying of Moses’ Five Books again and again. His question takes on a special poignancy by the fact that he literally knows the letters of the Commandments backwards and forwards. Maybe he can even write them in his sleep! But unlike some of the Scribes we encounter in the Gospels, this believer is not trying to use a question to trap Jesus or trip him up for some ulterior worldly motive. This scribe is a pious believer who believes in the Torah he labors over, a true “son of Abraham,” “an Israelite indeed, in whom there is no deceit” like the disciple Nathaniel. He recognizes that Jesus is explicating the Law and the Prophets in an entirely new way. And so he asks Jesus a honest question and listens carefully to the answer. And he is praised by the Teacher for being a scribe that more than just knowing his trade– how to write the literal letters of the words of the Law– also has the spirit of the Law written on his heart.

As we continue to learn more about the Tree of Life Synagogue attack in Pittsburgh, let us lift up in prayer the victims and families of that senseless tragedy. We Christians worship a Jewish Messiah, whom we proudly proclaim to be “son of David, and son of Abraham.” We continually invoke the intercession of our most loving and protective Jewish mother, the Blessed Virgin Mary. Let us pray for all of our Jewish brothers and sisters, asking the One True God — God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob — to keep all His children, Jew and Gentile alike, safe from violence and hate.

Fr. Matthew Morris

Gospel Reflection Oct 28 – Deacon Paul

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Gospel Reflection
October 28, 2018

Sunday, October 28

Thirtieth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mark 10: 46 – 52

Gospel:
As Jesus was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a sizable crowd,
Bartimaeus, a blind man, the son of Timaeus,
sat by the roadside begging.
On hearing that it was Jesus of Nazareth,
he began to cry out and say,
“Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.”
And many rebuked him, telling him to be silent.
But he kept calling out all the more,
“Son of David, have pity on me.”
Jesus stopped and said, “Call him.”
So they called the blind man, saying to him,
“Take courage; get up, Jesus is calling you.”
He threw aside his cloak, sprang up, and came to Jesus.
Jesus said to him in reply, “What do you want me to do for you?”
The blind man replied to him, “Master, I want to see.”
Jesus told him, “Go your way; your faith has saved you.”
Immediately he received his sight
and followed him on the way.

Reflection:
“Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.” In today’s Gospel, a blind man by the name of Bartimaeus is desperate for healing, so he boldly cries out to Jesus. He wants the help that he believes Jesus can offer him. Bartimaeus is very much different from that of James and John in the Gospel last week when they asked Jesus to “do for us whatever we ask.” When it comes to understanding what Jesus has come to do, the disciples James and John are more “blind” than Bartimaeus. When Jesus asked him “what do you want me to do for you?” he instead asks not to be seen, but to see — not for honor, but for vision – not to be superior over others, but to become ordinary.

So, what do we want from Jesus? Why are we seeking Him? Do we want wealth? Power? Prestige? Whatever darkness clouds our vision, whatever forces stand between us and salvation, we cannot let anything distract us from the one answer, the only answer that can restore us and make us whole. That answer is the merciful love of God.

Bartimaeus is healed because of his faith in Jesus. Once cured, he abandoned everything and followed Jesus along the road and goes up with Him toward Calvary. He becomes a model disciple for all of us who want to follow Jesus. Even without his eyes, he saw more clearly than those around him. Though he was blind physically he had 20/20 spiritual vision. So, how clear is your vision or are you spiritually blind?

Deacon Paul Zemanek