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Allie Wing

St. Brigid Older Adults Program

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Have You Heard of Our New Program with Syntero — Parishioners Helping Parishioners?  Request Help or Get Involved Now…

Older Adults:  Do you want to stay at home safely, but need a little help getting to the store, a doctor appointment, or even need a ride to church?  Do you need a little help organizing in your home, or would you just like a parishioner from St. Brigid to spend a little time with you every once in awhile?

Caregivers:  Do you care for an older adult and need help or guidance?  Do you need help understanding the needs of an older loved one and learning what alternatives are available?  It can all be very confusing, time consuming and stressful. The services provided by Syntero are available at no charge and are designed to give you a helping hand and to assist you in becoming a more effective caregiver, including the need for your own self-care and stress management.

Potential Volunteers:  Do you have time to help an older adult parishioner in need?  Do you feel called to help others or give back to the church?  Helping an older adult parishioner can be very rewarding and is so appreciated by those who are in need.  There are one-time and ongoing opportunities.   We accommodate all schedules and will set up either a short or long term match with a parishioner in need. Opportunities are based on your schedule and flexibility — any amount of time you’re able to give is enough and Syntero will train you! Our focus at St. Brigid is hospitality, which means welcoming and helping each other.  Please help us to further this goal, keeping in mind what Jesus taught us:  ” Whatever you did for the least of these brothers and sisters of mine, you did for me.”  Matthew 25:40.

If you answered “yes” to any of the above questions, or if you are interested in learning more about the services available for yourself, a senior loved one, or a caregiver you know; or if you have time to help an older adult parishioner, please contact Kim VanHuffel at kvanhuffel@stbrigidofkildare.org.

To provide these programs, St. Brigid of Kildare has partnered with Syntero, Inc., formerly Dublin Counseling Center, a local non-profit agency that has been serving Dublin residents for 40 years.  Thanks to the generous funding from the City of Dublin, Syntero’s senior supportive services have now been expanded and are available to all Saint Brigid of Kildare parishioners through our Parishioners Helping Parishioners program. Syntero’s services can also link seniors with personal or mental health counseling for stress, anxiety or depression (office or home visits).  There is no charge for these services.

Gospel Reflection July 9 – Msgr. Hendricks

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Sunday, July 9

Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Matthew 11: 25 – 30

 

Gospel:
At that time Jesus exclaimed:
“I give praise to you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth,
for although you have hidden these things
from the wise and the learned
you have revealed them to little ones.
Yes, Father, such has been your gracious will.
All things have been handed over to me by my Father.
No one knows the Son except the Father,
and no one knows the Father except the Son
and anyone to whom the Son wishes to reveal him.”

“Come to me, all you who labor and are burdened,
and I will give you rest.
Take my yoke upon you and learn from me,
for I am meek and humble of heart;
and you will find rest for yourselves.
For my yoke is easy, and my burden light.”

Reflection:
Jesus speaks of two things in the gospel today, the little ones who share in the wisdom and knowledge of God, and the yoke which as disciples of Jesus we are asked to bear.

Contrary to the wisdom of the world, it is the little ones, meaning those who accept the words and deeds of Jesus who are exalted as opposed to the puffed up wise and clever who only parrot his words.

The second image of the yoke which is normally a cross bar that ties two animals to servitude is used here as a yoke of rest meaning the other party tied with us is Jesus himself who when walking in harmony with Him gives us freedom and rest.

Reflect on your journey today with Jesus and pray to qualify by His grace as a partner yoked to Him and become His companion going down the road.

Monsignor Hendricks

Gospel Reflection July 2 – Deacon Chris

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Sunday, July 2

Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Matthew 10: 37 – 42

 

Gospel:
Jesus said to his apostles:
“Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me,
and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me;
and whoever does not take up his cross
and follow after me is not worthy of me.
Whoever finds his life will lose it,
and whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.

“Whoever receives you receives me,
and whoever receives me receives the one who sent me.
Whoever receives a prophet because he is a prophet
will receive a prophet’s reward,
and whoever receives a righteous man
because he is a righteous man
will receive a righteous man’s reward.
And whoever gives only a cup of cold water
to one of these little ones to drink
because the little one is a disciple-
amen, I say to you, he will surely not lose his reward.”

 

Reflection:
It’s hard to follow Jesus Christ, to be a Christian, but it’s worth it.

That sums up the message our Lord is trying to communicate to us in today’s Gospel passage and it’s a message that we constantly need to be reminded of. At first, it almost seems like Jesus is trying to discourage us from following him. He warns that friendship with him is demanding. To be a true friend of Jesus Christ means that everything else has to be put in second place. Everything has to be put on the table, even personal dreams, even family ties. The demands of our friendship with Jesus Christ will require us to carry a cross, to sacrifice self-gratifying desires, maybe even to endure great suffering. That sounds hard, painful, maybe even unreasonable.

But the good Lord knows what He is doing.

And if he calls us to this kind of life style, which he does, it’s only because he knows that this is the path to lasting happiness. If we are truly living for God, to give him glory and to build up his Kingdom in the world, then God will take care of us. We will not lose our reward. In order to share Christ’s life, the life of the redeemed soul, the new life of grace won for us by Christ’s passion and resurrection, then we must also share in His death. We have to die to self, to put to death all selfish and self-centered desires, in order to rise with Christ and to live the life of the Spirit, the life that gives true meaning and satisfaction to our lives. Yes, it is hard to follow Jesus, but it is worth it. In truth, nothing else even comes close.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Deacon Chris Tuttle

Gospel Reflection June 23 – Fr. Morris

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Sunday, June 25

Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Matthew 10: 26 – 33

 

Gospel:
Jesus said to the Twelve:
“Fear no one.
Nothing is concealed that will not be revealed,
nor secret that will not be known.
What I say to you in the darkness, speak in the light;
what you hear whispered, proclaim on the housetops.
And do not be afraid of those who kill the body but cannot kill the soul;
rather, be afraid of the one who can destroy
both soul and body in Gehenna.
Are not two sparrows sold for a small coin?
Yet not one of them falls to the ground without your Father’s knowledge.
Even all the hairs of your head are counted.
So do not be afraid; you are worth more than many sparrows.
Everyone who acknowledges me before others
I will acknowledge before my heavenly Father.
But whoever denies me before others,
I will deny before my heavenly Father.”

 

Reflection:
The vast number of politicians are boring. “Boring” in the good sense, in that they are honest civil servants raising their families while striving to enact legislation that benefits the populace. They are so “boring” that most of us cannot name our federal, state, city, or other elected representatives.

But the popular stereotype of the “sleazy and amoral politician,” is probably due to the deluge of media attention that a political scandal attracts. Scandal sells, and it sells very well. Long before 24-hr news channels arose, American newspapers were full daily of the outrageous allegations of scandal thrown about by Jackson and Adams in the 1828 presidential election. Allegations of murder, bigamy, and elitism were followed by — in an instance of “past is prologue”– questions of what exactly went on in those conversations Adams had with Czar Alexander when he was the first U.S. minister to Russia.

When we see how much attention even allegations of scandal gets, one wonders why some politicians think they can get away with actual scandal. Whether it is bribery, cronyism, or just that worn chestnut of marital infidelity, unscrupulous politicians forget the warning of Our Lord in today’s Gospel: “Nothing is concealed that will not be revealed, nor secret that will not be known.”

We can be thankful that most politicians– and most of us– are too boring to merit the attention of the entire press. All of us have parts of our life that we struggle at, or in which we suffer humiliating failures, and would like to keep private. Our spiritual life is no different. The Sacrament of Confession is done quietly in the privacy of the confessional, not in the sanctuary before the eyes of the entire congregation.

But Our Lord is reminding us of the price of true Christian discipleship. Our entire life must be Christian. We cannot wall off the person we are on Sunday morning from other aspects of our life. We must strive to acknowledge our Father and Jesus Christ before our neighbors, coworkers, and others through the way we live our lives. We must strive to do our Christian duty quietly and without fanfare. We must live our lives so that, if our actions were ever subjected to the scrutiny of the entire press, all that would be unearthed is just how Christian and “boring” our lives have been.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Father Morris

Becoming Heart Sisters registration

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Becoming Heart Sisters

 

A Bible Study on Authentic Friendships

Becoming Heart Sisters is a beautiful reminder of how powerful walking hand and hand with a loyal friend can be.

Registration deadline is September 1, 2017.

Program Dates: September 13,20, 27 and October 4, 11, 18 and 25 from 7:00- 8:30 PM in Immke Room of Hendricks Hall.

Total Cost (which includes your book) is $30.00 – bring payment at first session).

Please register early so we have a sufficient number of books for session 1.

Register here.

Gospel Reflection June 18 – Deacon Paul

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Sunday, June 18

The Solemnity of the Body & Blood of Christ

John 6: 51 – 58

 

Gospel:
Jesus said to the Jewish crowds:
“I am the living bread that came down from heaven;
whoever eats this bread will live forever;
and the bread that I will give
is my flesh for the life of the world.”

The Jews quarreled among themselves, saying,
“How can this man give us his flesh to eat?”
Jesus said to them,
“Amen, amen, I say to you,
unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood,
you do not have life within you.
Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood
has eternal life,
and I will raise him on the last day.
For my flesh is true food,
and my blood is true drink.
Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood
remains in me and I in him.
Just as the living Father sent me
and I have life because of the Father,
so also the one who feeds on me
will have life because of me.
This is the bread that came down from heaven.
Unlike your ancestors who ate and still died,
whoever eats this bread will live forever.”

 

Reflection:
In the gospel according to John, Jesus compares himself to the manna with which God fed the people of Israel. Like manna, Jesus is the bread that comes from heaven. However, Jesus is a better food than manna. Jesus tells the people, “Unlike your ancestors who ate and still died, whoever eats this bread will live forever.”

Besides physical hunger, we experience another hunger, a hunger that cannot be satisfied with ordinary food. It’s a hunger for life, a hunger for love, a hunger for eternity. Jesus says, “the bread that I will give is my flesh for the life of the world.” The bread that Jesus gives us is His life, His death, and His resurrection for our salvation.

In our busy lives, we are exposed all the time to other “offers of food” which do not come from the Lord and at times can appear to be more satisfying to us. Sometimes we nourish ourselves with financial wealth, other times it might be success and vanity, and at other times it might be power and pride. No matter what these other sources of food might be in our lives, the only food that can truly nourish us and satisfy us is that which is given to us by the Lord.

Jesus instructs us that the Eucharist is the “new manna,” the new bread from heaven, the new way that God gives us daily sustenance. If we truly appreciate it and understand it, we go to the Eucharist with a desire to stay alive. The Eucharist is meant to be God’s regular nourishment for us, daily manna to keep us alive within the desert of our lives.

Deacon Paul Zemanek

Gospel Reflection June 11 – Deacon Don

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Sunday, June 11

The Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity

John 3: 16 – 18

Gospel:
God so loved the world that he gave his only Son,
so that everyone who believes in him might not perish
but might have eternal life.
For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world,
but that the world might be saved through him.
Whoever believes in him will not be condemned,
but whoever does not believe has already been condemned,
because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God.
Reflection:
This Gospel is so often seen in banners at sporting events (John 3:16) that the significance of this passage may be lost and reduced to some banner toting Christian extremist. This passage should not be reduced to mere cliche. If we reflect on it a bit, we should understand how important and true this passage is and how relevant it should be in our daily life.

If you believe in the Father, the Creator – who created man and woman with free will, then it should not be too much of a stretch to wonder about the many ways we have abused our free will. That abuse of free will is called sin. If the Father is the creator of only goodness, then all that creation must be good even to the extent that true free will must allow us to depart from purely good acts. Just ask any parent about their adolescent children, so we must have some way to counter the abuses of free will. We call that grace. If we buy all of that then it should not be too much of a stretch to realize that someone must show us the way to engage in God’s gift of grace. The best way to show us is to offer us an example of grace itself – Jesus Christ. He lived among us and experienced everything human except sin. He is grace itself. Once Jesus has revealed to us the Father’s goodness in everything created, we now have a living example, born of a woman, an example of free will revealing the Father’s full intent through the Son. It is not too much of a stretch that after the Son ascended into Heaven, he would not leave us to muddle around into eternity on our own. He would leave us with the means for continued access to the Father’s grace through the Holy Spirit and His Church.

Without some experience and devotion to the Holy Trinity in our daily lives, the entire world and all of creation would be simply an absurdity. Our daily news and the media overload us with routine abuses of free will. This can easily lead us into disappointment and despair. Keeping the Holy Trinity and the perfect unity the Trinity provides, we can realize that we are never alone. The Holy Spirit’s presence gives us ready access to the Son and the Father and should return the world back from mere absurdity to our own devotion to properly exercising our free will to the Father’s purpose. The Holy Trinity remains a mystery, but one of more relevance in our devotion to it.

Deacon Don Poirier

Gospel Reflection June 4 – Deacon Frank

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Sunday, June 4

Pentecost Sunday

John 20: 19 – 23

Gospel:
On the evening of that first day of the week,
when the doors were locked, where the disciples were,
for fear of the Jews,
Jesus came and stood in their midst
and said to them, “Peace be with you.”
When he had said this, he showed them his hands and his side.
The disciples rejoiced when they saw the Lord.
Jesus said to them again, “Peace be with you.
As the Father has sent me, so I send you.”
And when he had said this, he breathed on them and said to them,
“Receive the Holy Spirit.
Whose sins you forgive are forgiven them,
and whose sins you retain are retained.”
Reflection:
Pentecost Sunday formally brings to a close the 50 days of the Easter Season. This day is known as the “birthday” of the Church. That is, of course, all of us. We were born on this day. The Holy Spirit came and enlivened a group that had almost died. The risen Lord sent his living Spirit to be our life. Each one of us, as well as the whole Church together, receives these gifts, and these gifts need to be used.

We begin with the gift of PEACE. Not the world’s peace, initially, but our own. We seek to grow in the gift of a peaceful mind and heart, and peaceful relationships in our life. That is our first prayer. “Come Holy Spirit, into my heart and mind and life.”

The second gift is MISSION. All of us are sent from this church building into the world around us. We are able, with the Holy Spirit’s help, to be outgoing and to help bring a gift of peace into the lives of those we live with, play with, study with and work with. It is a grace given to us. Do not let it go for nothing. WE can inspire others.

Finally, the third gift is the GRACE to reconcile people who struggle or are at war with one another. There is the power to forgive others and the power to call people to justice. May we believe this and may we accept this.

Come Holy Spirit!

Deacon Frank Iannarino

Gospel Reflection May 28 – Sr. Teresa

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Sunday, May 28

The Ascension of the Lord

Matthew 28: 16 – 20

Gospel:
The eleven disciples went to Galilee,
to the mountain to which Jesus had ordered them.
When they saw him, they worshiped, but they doubted.
Then Jesus approached and said to them,
“All power in heaven and on earth has been given to me.
Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations,
baptizing them in the name of the Father,
and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit,
teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you.
And behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.”
Reflection:
Since Easter we have been playing, “Now you see me; Now you don’t.” with Jesus.” He rose and then he was gone again. He appears to different people and different groups and then he is gone again.

I always wondered what was he doing during that time. Where was Jesus when he wasn’t appearing to people? I would have wanted to keep him with me every single minute. I would have said I am not ready for you to leave me alone. I would have bombarded him with questions: What about this? What about that? What should I do if…? I would have hung on his every word and took lots of notes.

When I look at the things he said at the various appearances, I so resonate with the disciples.

“Go tell the others…” We are always being sent out to proclaim that Jesus has risen. We are being sent to spread the message… to be Jesus in the world.

“Thomas, put your hand into my wounds…” Was Jesus telling them and us that we must be in touch with the suffering of the world? Is he asking us to step into the suffering of the world with the same compassion and mercy that he showed? The suffering of others is the suffering of Jesus.

Then my favorite invitation of Jesus is, “Let’s eat.” And they sat down to share a meal. Continually Jesus calls us to the table. He calls us to come and eat the Bread of Life. He knew we would get hungry over and over again. Hungry for wisdom, hungry for courage, hungry for faith, hungry for community.

Do you sometimes feel that now you see Jesus and everything seems just right? Then you don’t see him and you begin to doubt or waiver in the faith or just drift into complacency? Today Jesus is telling them and us that he is going back to his Father (leaving again). It is the day we remember as we celebrate the feast of the Ascension.

With this gospel passage we have come full circle from the empty tomb of Easter. When Mary Magdalene saw Jesus outside the tomb he gave her a message, “Go and tell the others that I have risen and I will meet them in Galilee”. Today we find them in Galilee. They did what Jesus had told them to do. I am drawn to the verse: “When they saw him, they worshiped, but they doubted.” I don’t know about you, but this is the story of my life. I try do what he taught us to do. I believe in Jesus. I worship Jesus, but at times, I also doubt Jesus or struggle with faith. I drift and at times seem to take Jesus for granted.
Read the passage carefully. Jesus does this most amazing thing before he leaves. Knowing that the disciples are weak, knowing that sometimes they will fail and doubt, he also knows that they are faithful. Our faithfulness is what he focuses upon. Jesus gives them a mission. Yes, in their vulnerability, in their strength and in their weakness, in their faithfulness and in their sin, he gives them a mission, “Go and make disciples of all nations.”

We are gathered, not in Galilee, but at St. Brigid of Kildare Parish in Dublin. We, like the disciples, come amazed, fearful, doubtful, and hungry. In the midst of our vulnerability we, too, are given a mission. You and I have been commissioned to go and tell the others that indeed Jesus is risen. Jesus lives. We receive this commissioning at the end of every Mass. Go, the Mass is ended. Go, you have been fed by Word and the Bread of Life. Go you have been strengthened by the faith community gathered together. Go, and live as believers. Go, and share the good news.

Like the disciples, we are sent with the same reassurance that we do not go alone. We have a faith community and we have a promise, “I am with you always.” How much more do we need to get on with it, to get on with telling others the good news?

There is a legend that grew around Jesus’ Ascension into heaven. It seems that when Jesus arrived in heaven, an angel greeted him. The angel asked Jesus – “What did you do on earth to ensure that your mission and work would continue?” Jesus simply said, “I entrusted it all to a small band of men and women.” The angel stopped and looked dumbfounded. “You what?” Jesus repeated what he had said: “I entrusted it all to a small band of men and women.” The angel said, “What if they fail?” Without hesitation Jesus responded, “They will not fail.” With Jesus’ faith in us — we will not fail.
Sister Teresa Tuite, OP