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Allie Wing

Lenten Video Message from Monsignor Hendricks

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February 12, 2021

Click here to watch a video message from Monsignor Hendricks regarding Lent 2021.

Dear Parishioners,

As we approach the start of the Lenten season, we may be feeling like we have already endured a year-long Lent because of the sacrifices and losses we have had from the coronavirus and its many effects on us all. However, this Lenten season, unlike any other, can give us the chance to pause and step back and reflect on this past year. Instead of focusing on what we don’t have and what we have lost, can we shift our focus? That is what Lent has always invited us to do — slow down, step back, and remember our truest identity as sons and daughters of God. What have you learned from this past year, and what blessings have you received? I think you may find that you have gained a lot.

As we prepare for Ash Wednesday and the start of the Lenten season next week, I want to share what we will be offering at St. Brigid of Kildare Parish. We will continue to offer many ways for you to participate in the traditional Lenten practices of prayer, fasting and almsgiving, both virtually and in-person.

  • We will be offering two in-person Ash Wednesday prayer services with the distribution of ashes, as well as a traditional Mass with ash distribution at 9 AM. Reservations are required for these services and are available here. We will also have a virtual blessing of ashes and prayer service.
  • We will offer the Sacrament of Reconciliation in-person on Mondays during March. This also requires reservations.
  • We will again offer virtual options for Taize, Stations of the Cross, and Soup Suppers. These will be a combination of videos available to watch anytime and live virtual sessions.
  • Soup Suppers this year will be live via Zoom on Tuesday nights at 6 PM. They will feature guest chefs from our parish sharing with you a favorite recipe, followed by prayer together.
  • There will also be Lenten prayer services and adult faith formation opportunities led by Sister Teresa on Zoom.

More details of all of these offerings are available here. Our Holy Week schedule and reservation information is also listed on the Lent webpage.

All parishioners will be receiving a Lenten book mailed to their homes next week. This includes all of these offerings and some information about the traditional practices of Lent. I encourage you to read this book.

In addition, this Lent our parish will be participating in a parish-wide survey about discipleship conducted by the Catholic Leadership Institute. This is a 10-15 minute survey that will be emailed to you next Wednesday with more details. Please look for that email and I encourage you to complete the survey which will ask you to reflect on your own spiritual growth.

As we look forward to this new season in our lives, we ask you to continue to remain vigilant in your responsibility to stop the spread of this virus. We may feel as though the end is near, but we cannot give up yet. Please continue to practice social distancing, mask-wearing and sanitation in order to care for all of our brothers and sisters, especially those most vulnerable, and please continue to pray for all those affected by this virus in innumerable ways.

Blessings,
Monsignor Hendricks

Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Reservations Live Mar 1 at 10 AM

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Reservations will be required to attend all Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday, Good Friday, and Easter Sunday Masses and services.

To accommodate as many as possible, we will also be livestreaming some of these Masses in Hendricks Hall and in the Robert D. Walter Family Gymnasium. These locations also require reservations. 

 

Mass reservations will be live on our website beginning Monday, March 1 at 10 AM. Reservations will close on March 22. To make a reservation, visit www.stbrigidofkildare.org and click the “Lent 2021” link in the top black bar. You will be able to select the location (church, Hendricks Hall or gymnasium) for each Mass. Once the capacity for each location is full, that option will be closed out.

 

All Masses will be livestreamed at youtube.com/stbrigidofkildarechurch. Please consider this option for celebrating the Holy Week and Easter safely at home. 

 

For Mass times and details, visit www.stbrigidofkildare.org/Lent

Parish-Wide Survey Coming Soon – Please Read

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St. Brigid of Kildare Parish will be participating in a parish survey about discipleship conducted by the Catholic Leadership Institute.  We need your help!

 

Please help us by participating in a 10-15 minute survey online.  The survey can be accessed through an online link from February 17, 2021 – March 21, 2021 and will ask you to reflect on your own spiritual growth and enable you to provide feedback on our parish’s efforts to help you grow.  All responses will be confidential and the parish will only receive information about the community as a whole. We will share the link with you a bit closer to the launch of the survey.

 

We are trying to get the highest response rate possible.  This information will be invaluable to Monsignor Hendricks and our various ministries as we plan for the future and strive to be the best disciples we can be.  We will receive the results this spring/summer at which time we will share what we have learned with the entire parish.

 

If you prefer a paper copy you may pick up a paper copy of the survey in the parish office.  A printable version of the survey will also be available. To submit the completed paper survey, please drop off or mail to the parish office. 

 

Thank you for helping with this important project!

Ash Wednesday Mass Reservations Live

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Our Ash Wednesday Mass reservations are now live.

Click here to make reservations.

  • Reservation Notes:
    Reservations are limited to groups of 6. If your immediate family has more than 6, make a reservation for 6 then contact the parish office at (614) 761-3734.
  • If you need to cancel or edit your reservation, you can do so in your confirmation email or by calling the parish office.
  • Masks are required to be worn in all parish buildings. Please do not come if you are experiencing any symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Reservations are required to attend any of the Ash Wednesday prayer services or Mass. After making a reservation, you will receive a confirmation email. You will receive another email with more details a few days prior to Ash Wednesday.
  • Seats will be assigned in all buildings in order to accommodate the most people safely in the spaces. Check-in with a greeter upon arrival, who will seat your family when all members are present (no printed reservation is necessary). More details will be provided via email.
  • Reservations for Ash Wednesday close Monday, February 15.

Thank you for your cooperation and care during this difficult time. Please continue to pray for all those affected by this virus in innumerable ways.

Ash Wednesday Schedule at St. Brigid of Kildare:

In-Person Offerings:
6:30 AM – Prayer service in the church with distribution of ashes
9:00 AM – Mass in the church with distribution of ashes
7:00 PM – Prayer service in the church with distribution of ashes

At Home Offerings:
Blessing of ashes by Monsignor Hendricks and virtual prayer service — available on YouTube page beginning Feb 17
9 AM – Livestream of Ash Wednesday Mass

Please remember Ash Wednesday is not a Holy Day of Obligation.

Note on Distribution of Ashes:
Vatican modifies distribution of ashes for Ash Wednesday
By Vatican News
The health situation caused by Covid-19 continues to force changes on daily life, which are also reflected in the Church’s sphere. Ahead of the beginning of Lent, on Wednesday, 17 February, the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments has published a note laying out the procedures Catholic priests around the world are to follow for the distribution of ashes at the start of Lent. The priest will bless the ashes, sprinkle them with holy water and distribute by sprinkling the ashes on each person’s head in silence.

Gospel Reflection Feb 7 – Deacon Don

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Sunday, February 7

Fifth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mark 1: 29 – 39

Gospel:

On leaving the synagogue
Jesus entered the house of Simon and Andrew with James and John.
Simon’s mother-in-law lay sick with a fever.
They immediately told him about her.
He approached, grasped her hand, and helped her up.
Then the fever left her and she waited on them.

When it was evening, after sunset,
they brought to him all who were ill or possessed by demons.
The whole town was gathered at the door.
He cured many who were sick with various diseases,
and he drove out many demons,
not permitting them to speak because they knew him.

Rising very early before dawn, he left
and went off to a deserted place, where he prayed.
Simon and those who were with him pursued him
and on finding him said, “Everyone is looking for you.”
He told them, “Let us go on to the nearby villages
that I may preach there also.
For this purpose have I come.”
So he went into their synagogues,
preaching and driving out demons throughout the whole of Galilee.

Gospel Reflection:

This Gospel is a continuation of last week’s Gospel, where Jesus was teaching with authority and then heals a man possessed with an unclean spirit in the synagogue in Capernaum. Here, Jesus leaves the synagogue and enters the house of Simon (Peter) and Andrew. Jesus finds Peter’s mother-in-law ill with fever and heals her. To reflect for a moment, these are real places you can see today, when visiting Capernaum. The synagogue ruins still exist. You can walk on its stone floor and visualize how the structure looked back in Jesus’ time. The house mentioned in today’s Gospel is about 200 feet away from the synagogue. When walking this space today, you can easily imagine Jesus’ actions in today’s Gospel and walk in his footsteps, which is what he wants us to do.

Jesus created quite a stir with the healing of the man possessed with an unclean spirit. The people wanted more; however, it was the sabbath and the rules of the day suggested no unnecessary work until sunset — the traditional end of the sabbath. Then, the people come out to seek Jesus knowing he was staying at Peter’s house. Jesus heals many that evening.

One interesting thing to note is in both Gospels, last week’s and this week’s, the demons were silenced by Jesus because they knew him. We are left as to why silence them? Throughout Mark’s Gospel, Jesus continuously confronts demons. In many cases, they recognize who Jesus is and Jesus silences them. Theologians have labeled this behavior as the Messianic Secret. Mark’s Gospel presents Jesus as someone who acts, heals, and prays. We are to take his lead in our own experience and in our lives.
We are asked to act — even Peter’s mother-in-law immediately begins to serve, once healed. This is not a sign of servitude, but part of our nature of service to others. It is through our actions that we show others who we really are.

We are asked to heal — perhaps our healings are not in the dramatic sense as miracles, but with our actions and words to be used to heal others. We can become sources of healing for others.

We are asked to pray — Jesus himself prays. Can we do less? Prayer is the source of replenishment to be able to face what’s next. Another day in the life of Jesus can translate to another day in our lives. Prayer is the food to meet tomorrow’s challenges and needs to act and heal.

Jesus demands the demons remain silent — and never trust the demons that claim to speak on Jesus’ behalf. The demons in our lives will speak to us and distort the act, heal, and pray mission in our lives.

-Deacon Don Poirier

Gospel Reflection Jan 31 – Deacon Frank

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Sunday, January 31

Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mark 1: 21 – 28

Gospel:

Then they came to Capernaum,
and on the sabbath Jesus entered the synagogue and taught.
The people were astonished at his teaching,
for he taught them as one having authority and not as the scribes.
In their synagogue was a man with an unclean spirit;
he cried out, “What have you to do with us, Jesus of Nazareth?
Have you come to destroy us?
I know who you are—the Holy One of God!”
Jesus rebuked him and said,
“Quiet! Come out of him!”
The unclean spirit convulsed him and with a loud cry came out of him.
All were amazed and asked one another,
“What is this?
A new teaching with authority.
He commands even the unclean spirits and they obey him.”
His fame spread everywhere throughout the whole region of Galilee.

Gospel Reflection:

Many think that prophecy is solely about predicting the future. While this may define some aspects of a prophet’s resume, often the primary concern of the Sunday prophets has to do with what is happening right now.

In this weekend’s Gospel, Jesus, the Son of God, appears as a prophet amid his followers. Jesus’ authoritative nature which stands out forcefully when speaking on Yahweh’s behalf is clear of the uniqueness of his task: “All were amazed and asked one another. What is this? A new teaching with authority’…His fame spread everywhere throughout the whole region of Galilee.”

Whether through prophets, apostolic letters, or his own son (Jesus), God is constantly speaking to us His word of truth, direction, and encouragement. He invites us to take His word to heart so that we might be strengthened and healed.

Most believers don’t think of themselves as prophets. This is especially true when they consider the menacing prophets from the Old Testament. They cringe at the over-the-top bizarre lifestyle of Elijah, Isaiah, Jonah, and John the Baptist, to name a few. Yet within the baptismal ritual following soon after the cleansing waters are poured over the newly baptized, prophets are mentioned. A priest or deacon takes the sacred chrism and says these words: “I anoint you with the Chrism of Salvation. As Jesus was anointed priest, prophet, and king so may you also live always as a member of His body.”

As Catholic Christians, we are called to be that prophetic voice in our families, at school, at work, on the team, in our neighborhoods, and in our community – wherever we go, wherever God sends us. Where can you be the voice of Jesus? What words will you say? May the gift of the Eucharist strengthen us always to be his voice of inclusion, forgiveness, and love.

-Deacon Frank Iannarino

Gospel Reflection Jan 24 – Sr. Teresa

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Sunday, January 24

Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Mark 1: 14-20

Gospel:

After John had been arrested,
Jesus came to Galilee proclaiming the gospel of God:
“This is the time of fulfillment.
The kingdom of God is at hand.
Repent, and believe in the gospel.”
As he passed by the Sea of Galilee,
he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting their nets into the sea;
they were fishermen.
Jesus said to them,
“Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.”
Then they abandoned their nets and followed him.
He walked along a little farther
and saw James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John.
They too were in a boat mending their nets.
Then he called them.
So they left their father Zebedee in the boat
along with the hired men and followed him.

Gospel Reflection:

I don’t know about you but I am still reeling from the riot and violence at the US Capitol on January 6th and all that has transpired since then. Back in May when I watched on TV the murder of George Floyd, I found that I could barely breathe. For months we have heard that one of the effects of COVID-19 is the inability or at least difficulty in breathing. So many things have left me breathless.

I have only stood in the Capitol Building once. I was breathless as I stood there in wonder and awe of all that it stood for in our country. On January 6 when I watched on TV the horrific actions of hatred that spilled out at the US Capitol, I again could barely catch my breath and tears rolled down my face. Perhaps, like many of you, I could not believe that what I was seeing was happening in the Capital, the sacred place of our country and government, in real-time and in my lifetime. I am still in a state of shock and disbelief and holding a great sense of sorrow and heartache. I vacillate between feelings of rage and a sense of speechlessness. How did such hatred and so many divisions happen? In the face of turbulent times in our country, our world and our church, where the needs run great and the complexity even greater, who are we to be, and what are we to do? How do we live with religious ambiguity and bring to it hope and light? I do believe the time of sitting back and watching is over. The time, like it was for the four in today’s gospel, for mending fishing nets, is over. The time of only saying how awful it all is and then moving about our daily activities can no longer be the path we choose. Yet how do we love in the face of hatred? How do we begin to mend a world that is so fractured? How do I reflect on today’s gospel passage? I grew up during President Kennedy’s tenure. He said, “Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country.” How pertinent that is for us today.

In this week’s gospel passage, we again hear the call of Andrew and Peter and we also hear the call of James and John, the sons of Zebedee. Reflecting on this particular scripture passage (the call of the first disciples) with these men quietly sitting by the Sea of Galilee mending fishing nets while we sit in the midst of such religious and global uncertainty seems not only daunting but seemingly so irrelevant to what is happening in the country right now. How do we weave the two together? Do the stories of the call of the disciples two weeks in a row hold some special significance? Is God trying to get our attention? Is Jesus calling and recalling us to be his followers? Could this passage actually be very relevant for the times in which we are living?

The four in the gospel today just got up and left the business to follow Jesus. Most of us may hear the story and the voices in our heads may tell us that it is naïve to think and nearly impossible to leave everything to follow Jesus. Most of us, truth be told, would find it very hard to leave work, family, friends and all the rest to venture into such an uncertain future. We will have many good and valuable reasons why that is not practical — not responsible, not even desired. What would make someone pick up and leave everything behind? Jesus is just beginning his ministry so they did not have the message and teaching of Jesus laid out before them, as we do in the Gospels. Why did they do it? What made them do it?

Last week’s passage coupled with this week’s passage offers great questions. From Jesus “What are you looking for?” From the disciples “Where do you live?” and Jesus’s response – “Come and See.” Where do you live implies a house and as I have mentioned many times before, a house in the scripture is more often than not a metaphor for the heart. Where is the heart of Jesus? It is with the disenfranchised, the poor, the neglected, those unwelcomed and those in need of healing. The heart of Jesus is about confronting religious and civil authorities that choose power over compassion, who work harder at separating people than uniting them. The heart of Jesus is about challenging those who put self-interest before the common good. The heart of Jesus does not separate people because of the color of their skin, their choice of political party, economic status, etc. The heart of Jesus does not hesitate to speak truth to power. If these men knew that this is “where Jesus lived” would they have left everything to follow Jesus? We do know that this is what Jesus is about. Does knowing ”where Jesus lives,” knowing Jesus’ heart, make us reluctant or hesitant to leave it all and follow him?

They did not have an easy time in living out their decision to be a follower of Jesus. As the gospel unfolds in the next few months, we learn that they sometimes end up disappointing, denying and abandoning Jesus at various points in their journey. That sounds like our discipleship journey too. Disciples mess up but then they get up, ask for and accept forgiveness and move on.

As we look at the multitude of pandemics that continue to sweep across our world: coronavirus, systemic racism, injustice, violence, economic insecurity, scarcity of food, for so many, the destruction of the planet and the latest horror and fear brought on by the unbridled hatred and violence at our nation’s capital, we might wonder what are we to do?

Truth be told, I would rather just sit quietly by a lake mending my fishing nets. It is not easy to hear the call, sometimes I pretend I don’t hear it. Yet, Jesus is relentless and unrelenting. He needs his followers to go and see that the needs of our brothers and sisters are great. He needs us to respond. What might we have to leave behind to follow him? I don’t think Jesus is asking us to leave behind our work or our family. But what might we have to leave behind? I have to leave my own prejudices, my own biases, opinions, my own racism, attitudes and self-righteousness. What might you have to leave behind? Remember the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, JR – “Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.” Will we choose darkness and hate or will we leave everything, go and see where Jesus lives (his heart) and follow Jesus with light and love? Will we be weighed down by the hatred in the world or choose to be lifted up by the power of God and guided by the Spirit with us?

Sister Teresa Tuite, OP

P.S. The above was written before the inauguration of Joseph Biden and Kamala Harris. Thank God it was peaceful. Now the work begins for each of us.

Ash Wednesday Schedule – Reservations Required

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St. Brigid of Kildare will be celebrating Ash Wednesday (February 17) with the following schedule.

RESERVATIONS REQUIRED:
Reservations will be required for all in-person services on Ash Wednesday. Reservations open at www.stbrigidofkildare.org/Lent on Monday, February 8 at 9 AM and close on February 15.

In-Person Offerings:
6:30 AM – Prayer service in the church with distribution of ashes
9:00 AM – Mass in the church with distribution of ashes
7:00 PM – Prayer service in the church with distribution of ashes

At Home Offerings:
Blessing of ashes by Monsignor Hendricks and virtual prayer service — available on YouTube page beginning Feb 17
9 AM – Livestream of Ash Wednesday Mass

Please remember Ash Wednesday is not a Holy Day of Obligation.

Note on Distribution of Ashes:
Vatican modifies distribution of ashes for Ash Wednesday
By Vatican News
The health situation caused by Covid-19 continues to force changes on daily life, which are also reflected in the Church’s sphere. Ahead of the beginning of Lent, on Wednesday, 17 February, the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments has published a note laying out the procedures Catholic priests around the world are to follow for the distribution of ashes at the start of Lent. The priest will bless the ashes, sprinkle them with holy water and distribute by sprinkling the ashes on each person’s head in silence.

Catholic Men’s Conference

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Men of St Brigid: The 24th Annual Catholic Men’s Conference for the Diocese of Columbus will be held virtually on Feb 27th, 2021.  The theme is “Called to Be Saints” and has a powerhouse of speakers lined up that includes, Fr. Don Calloway, Chris Stefanick, Bishop Brennan, and Devin Shadt, Author of the book – The Path.  Registration is open and the cost is only $10.   If you register before Feb 8th you will receive a free copy of the Book – The Path.  Best news is we are blessed to be hosting (barring any Covid restrictions) the Saturday event at the Parish from 12-3 pm with the opportunity afterwards for Adoration, Confession and Mass at the normal 5 pm time.  What a great opportunity for fellowship at St Brigid.  Do not delay, go to www.catholicmensministry.com to register.  Once registered you will receive more information.  Please call or text Gary Wallberg at 614-203-5450 with any questions.